Military Review

100 years of Russian glory. About Russian infantry

20



Thanks to the help of our colleague from Moscow Maxim Bochkov, a famous photographer among fans historical reconstruction, we met with a wonderful club of historical reconstruction "Infantheria" from the Moscow region.

The members of the Infanteriya club are reconstructing, thus paying tribute to the memory and respect to their fellow countrymen from the 209 Infantry Regiment of Bogorodsky, who fought during the First World War.

The regiment was part of the 1 brigade of the 53 th Infantry Division of the twentieth army corps of the 10 th Army of the Northern Front and fought in East Prussia.

During the retreat of the 10 Army from East Prussia in January-February 1915, the regiment covered parts of the 20th corps, was surrounded by the enemy in the August forests and suffered huge losses. Only about 200 people reached Grodno. Only a small number of Bogorodtsev fell into German captivity.

The regimental flag was saved by the regimental priests by Father Philotheus, thanks to which the regiment was re-equipped.

30 April 1915, the newly formed 209 Infantry Regiment of Bogorodsky, which was staffed by officers and soldiers from other regions of the country, became part of the 34 Army Corps of the North-Western Front that was formed. In 1916, part of the XXIII Army Corps participated in the Brusilov offensive in Volyn.

We recorded several stories of the club commander Andrei Bondar about the infantry weapons times of the First World War, which will be placed in the series "Tales of weapons." Andrew has a very impressive knowledge of the weapons of the time, we are sure it will be very informative.

But we will begin our stories with a demonstration of the uniform and equipment of the infantryman of the 209 Bogorodsky regiment during the First World War.

For those who do not like to watch the video (although it is worth it), we partially duplicate it in the old manner.



The Russian infantryman, going to the battlefields of the First World War, was equipped no worse than his allies or opponents.



We begin the review, of course, with the form.

The underwear consisted of underpants and a shirt made from cotton fabric. A uniform consisting of breeches and a tunic was also made of cotton fabric, or, for areas with a colder climate, of cloth.

Equipment. What the Russian infantryman took with him on the march.

Naturally, waist belt. On the belt there were two cartridge pouches for 30 cartridges each. Plus an additional cartridge pouch for bulk cartridges. At the beginning of the war, each infantryman still had a mounted bandolier on 30 cartridges, but in the second half of the war bandoliers were less common.



Rusk bag. They usually housed a dry ration, the so-called “knapsack stock”, consisting of crackers, dried fish, corned beef, canned food.

Overcoat From the so-called greatcoat cloth. In the warm season in skatka. To the ends of the overcoat did not crawl, a bowler and two leather straps were used for fastening.



The cloak with a set of pegs and pins was attached to the overcoat. It was necessary to have a rope about 3 meters long to fix the assembled tent.



In the cold season, when the overcoat was on the fighter, the raincoat with accessories was attached to the knapsack.



Satchel. Intended for storage and transportation of personal belongings of the soldier. A set of linen, footcloths, windings, personal hygiene items, stock of tobacco.

Each fighter relied small infantry shovel. Which was later called the sapper, but the correct name is just that. The blade holder was originally made of leather, and in time it began to be made from substitutes, tarpaulin or canvas.



Flask. Glass or aluminum, necessarily in a cloth case. The cover played the role of a heat insulator, and allowed not to heat the liquid in the heat or vice versa, not to freeze quickly in the cold.



Aluminum flask was attached to the flask (cup) for use, for example, alcoholic beverages. Charka Alcohol was relying on the Russian soldier 10 once a year, on major holidays. So basically the cup was intended for hot tea.

Cap. The standard headdress of the Russian infantryman was made either of cloth or of cotton fabric, depending on the climatic conditions. A steel spring was originally inserted into the cap, but it often broke, so it was not forbidden to wear a cap without a spring.



In winter, the soldier was given a sheep wool cap and camel hood.

Epaulettes The Russian soldier's shoulder straps were field (green) and ordinary, red. Guards regiments wore epaulets, sheathed edging "corporate" color of the regiment. On the epaulets usually put the number of the regiment.

Boots. The boots in the Russian imperial army were leather.



Over the course of the war, cheaper shoes with windings came into use. Winter shoes were boots.

The last detail in the soldier's equipment was a weapon. In our case, the Mosin rifle of the 1891 model of the year. And a bayonet. The bayonet should always have been attached.

Rifles were equipped with a belt, which, however, was not intended to be permanently worn. According to the regulations, the rifle was worn in the “on the shoulder” position.

100 years of Russian glory. About Russian infantry


We will tell you about the Mosin rifle itself and its rivals in the following articles prepared with the participation of the Infanteria Club.
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  1. Curious
    Curious 22 November 2017 16: 00 New
    +8
    "Boots. The boots in the Russian imperial army were leather."
    Boots for the guard and army infantry regiments arr. 1908 were of two types - the guards and the army.
    The difference was in the length of the shafts - in the army - 11 points, in the army - 10 points.
    There is an interesting book (for those interested, of course).

    Hundreds of types of clothing items are detailed in it. After all, some hats at clothing allowance consisted of 30 species, harem pants - 11 species.
    Moreover, the requirements for the reception of the material and the manufacturing process are carefully described.
    The process of "building" the same boots takes seven pages.
    1. Curious
      Curious 22 November 2017 20: 39 New
      +2
      Now I just saw a typo. The guard has 11 points, the army has 10 points.
  2. fighter angel
    fighter angel 22 November 2017 16: 26 New
    +5
    Quote: "... Epaulettes. The epaulettes of the Russian soldier were field (green) and ordinary, red. Guards regiments wore epaulets trimmed with edging of the" company "color of the regiment. Regiment number was usually marked on the epaulettes ...." Not all so clearly, the epaulettes of the infantry regiments in each division depended on the number of the regiment in the division, and accordingly differed in color and fringing. Not only red. For the entire guard, the color of the epaulettes was defined as red for the infantry and crimson for the shooters (field epaulets green with a colored edging).

    In the army, the color of shoulder straps was set:

    * Grenadier regiments - yellow (half epaulettes green) with scarlet edging in the 1st division of the corps; with a light blue edging in the 2nd division of the corps;

    with a white piping in the 3rd division of the corps.

    * infantry regiments - the 1st and 2nd regiments of the division have scarlet shoulder straps (field shoulder straps with a scarlet edging);

    The 3rd and 4th regiments of the division have light blue (field epaulets with a holy blue border).

    * Rifle regiments - raspberry epaulettes (field epaulets with raspberry edging.

    So here everything is much more serious and more complicated than presented in the article.
    1. Curious
      Curious 22 November 2017 20: 51 New
      +1
      "So here everything is much more serious and more complicated than presented in the article."
      Military uniformology is generally a serious science.
      Indeed, in addition to color and edging, there is also a list of ciphers on shoulder straps.
  3. Michael_Zverev
    Michael_Zverev 22 November 2017 16: 45 New
    +2
    Quote: Curious

    There is an interesting book (for those interested, of course).
    Curious. Don’t share the link?
    1. moskowit
      moskowit 22 November 2017 17: 43 New
      +2
      I join the request .... Humbly please share a reference ....
    2. Curious
      Curious 22 November 2017 19: 21 New
      +4
      http://xn--d1aabrhohbai1e3f.xn--p1ai/2014/08/%D1%
      81%D0%B1%D0%BE%D1%80%D0%BD%D0%B8%D0%BA-%D0%BE%D0%
      BF%D0%B8%D1%81%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%B8%D0%B9-%D0%BF%D1%
      80%D0%B5%D0%B4%D0%BC%D0%B5%D1%82%D0%BE%D0%B2/
      "Just do not use the function go to address"
      Just copy the link into the search and open the found site.
      1. Michael_Zverev
        Michael_Zverev 23 November 2017 04: 26 New
        +1
        Thank you!
  4. panzerfaust
    panzerfaust 22 November 2017 19: 34 New
    +2
    Mosin rifles - an infantry model. And some also had Nagant soldier revolvers, single action.
  5. Glory1974
    Glory1974 22 November 2017 20: 15 New
    0
    Interesting satchel. in the Red Army there was a thing-bag, colloquially "sidor". The thing bag of the Soviet army differed only in the presence of external straps for fastening property and a pocket.
    1. Lopatov
      Lopatov 22 November 2017 21: 21 New
      +4
      Quote: glory1974
      in the Red Army there was a thing-bag, colloquially "sidor".

      In the Red Army there were backpacks, and “lightweight backpacks”, and backpack packs, and, apparently, mobilization-duffel bags.
      In the Soviet Army, only duffel bags and taxiways. There were backpacks, but they were included in special equipment.
  6. polpot
    polpot 22 November 2017 23: 48 New
    +4
    Trousers of breeches in the Imperial and Soviet Army were not the subject of uniforms - trousers are what they were called.
  7. Fedorov
    Fedorov 23 November 2017 01: 00 New
    +3
    We will tell you about the Mosin rifle and its rivals in the following articles

    Roma, do not waste strength, everything has long been gnawed to the teeth. Then another debate will begin - Mauser or Mosinka, why the bayonet. Questions about fuses and footage from the White Sun of the Desert. The Americans and the British did not hit us. What for is this circus?
  8. infantryman2020
    infantryman2020 23 November 2017 07: 22 New
    +1
    How is this, no worse than allies and opponents ??
    If, for example:
    - There are no shoulder straps for equipment. Everything that hangs on the belt only loads the waist belt;
    - there is no protective helmet (neither steel nor leather). Yes appeared later allies / opponents.
    1. Ryazan87
      Ryazan87 23 November 2017 17: 23 New
      0
      - Guards satchel, for example (Wassmundt knapsack). Almost a prototype of a modern backpack. I tried it myself, it’s convenient in the trip.
      "... the Guard used backpacks that uniformly unloaded the weight they carried throughout their body with a wide belt and straps with hooks. It is interesting that Major General Vassmundt developed them. He commanded the Life Guards 1st Shooting Rifle Battalion and examined samples "equipment used in the German, Austrian, Danish, Swiss and Belgian armies."
      - a leather helmet (pickelhelm) was the main headdress of the Russian army in 1840-50. (not only cavalry). In practice, it proved to be an extremely inconvenient thing (though, largely due to the lack of covers).
      “there is no protective helmet” - who did they have in 1914? And Adrian, and wander it is 1915. German Stahlhelm - 1916. As the positional war began, helmets became needed. Russians yes, late - helmets appeared in the second half of 1916.
  9. kvs207
    kvs207 23 November 2017 08: 19 New
    +3
    Interestingly, but as a "model" could you find a more "brave soldier"?
    1. AlexVas44
      AlexVas44 27 November 2017 11: 45 New
      0
      Quote: kvs207
      But as a "model" could you find a more "brave soldier"?

      Is that the one on the left? laughing
  10. soldier
    soldier 23 November 2017 12: 21 New
    15
    The Russian infantryman, going to the battlefields of the First World War, was equipped no worse than his allies or opponents.

    In many ways - and better equipped.
    According to the mind, there was much in our army, what to say.
    Thank you
  11. soldier
    soldier 23 November 2017 12: 26 New
    17
    Uniformology is a serious and interesting science, as rightly noted
    I'm glad that such articles appear
  12. Ekzutor
    Ekzutor 24 November 2017 16: 48 New
    +4
    The practice of military history clubs is a weak base for a uniform article. Maybe because it is uninformative and suffers from some errors?
    The shoulder straps of the Russian soldier were field (green) and ordinary, red
    Don't the authors know that the color of the epaulettes in the regiments of the army infantry was not red for everyone: the 1st and 2nd regiments of the division had scarlet epaulets (field epaulets with a scarlet edging); The 3rd and 4th regiments of the division have light blue (field epaulets with a light blue edging).
    Such punctures are all the more surprising because there are a lot of special and really high-quality literature.
    Where are the details about equipment and uniforms? Pictures in close proximity will not always replace high-quality text.

    Wishes.

    To readers.
    To get acquainted with the works: V.V. Zvegintsev. Forms of the Russian army 1914. Paris, 1959 .; Schenk V.K. Tables of uniforms of the Russian army. SPb., 1910. and he. 1911. This is common.
    By infantry: O. Leonov, I. Ulyanov. Regular infantry 1855 - 1918 (3rd part of the three-volume). M., 1998.
    By cavalry: Zvegintsov V.V. Russian army cavalry 1907-1914. M., 1998; IN AND. Karpeev. Cavalry of the Russian army. July 1914 M., 2011.

    Authors

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