Military Review

"Beware, water!", Or Five terrifying facts about medieval hygiene

53



"It is necessary, it is necessary to wash in the mornings and evenings, and unclean chimney sweeps - shame and disgrace!". Since childhood, we have been taught that cleanliness is a guarantee of health. And in Russia, the bath was always held in high esteem, unlike in Europe, which for this reason was nicknamed unwashed. As you know, medieval Europeans neglected personal hygiene, and some were even proud of having washed only two or even once in their life.

People could wash in dirty water, often the whole family, and behind it the servants took turns washing in the same water. The Queen of Spain, Isabella of Castile, recognized that she had only washed twice in her entire life - at birth and on her wedding day. And Louis XIV also washed only two times in his life - and then on the advice of doctors. However, his washing was terrified and he didn’t do it. Russian ambassadors wrote that their majesty "stinks like a wild beast." And Pope Clement V died of dysentery.

Who are the "pearls of God"

The fact is that the Catholic Church forbade any ablutions except those that occur during baptism and before the wedding. It was believed that when immersed in hot water, the pores open through which water enters the body, which then will not find a way out. Thus, the body allegedly becomes vulnerable to infections. A bath - the heirs of the Roman term were considered the abode of debauchery. The church believed that a person should care more about the purity of the soul than the purity of the body. Ablution is often perceived as a medical procedure, after which people very often got sick.

It was also impossible to wash because it was possible to wash off the holy water, which I had touched at baptism. As a result, people did not wash for years, or even did not know the water at all. Lice were called "pearls of God" and considered a sign of holiness.


Rembrandt "A young woman bathing in a creek." 1654

Where did the phrase "money does not smell"

Unlike Europe, in Russia, the bath has always been held in high esteem. For the Slavs, the bath had not only hygienic, but also deep sacral meaning. The people believed that all sins would be washed away, therefore, once or even twice a week, they would go to the bathhouse. By the way, Dmitri the impostor did not like a bath, for which he was considered non-Russian. The Russians themselves in Europe were considered perverts because they went to the bath "too often."

But in ancient Rome, hygiene was lifted to unimaginable heights. Roman baths were visited daily. It was a separate culture. By the way, they housed public toilet rooms, where people communicated calmly. “Money does not smell!” - this catch phrase was uttered for the first time by the emperor Vespasian, when his son reproached him for imposing a tax on the toilets, while these places, in his opinion, should have remained free.

But what about Versailles? ..

But in Medieval Europe there were no toilets at all. Only the highest nobility. It is said that the French royal court periodically moved from castle to castle because there was literally nothing to breathe there. Lack of toilets absolutely no one confused. Even at Versailles there was not a single latrine place. The long corridors were covered with heavy curtains, behind which everybody was in need. It was then that the spirits gained the most popularity. Persistent aromas were designed to stifle the stench that came from human bodies.

Meanwhile, Louis XIV himself had a closet. As historians tell, he could sit on it and simultaneously receive guests. By the way, the first public toilet there appeared only in the XIX century. And it was intended only for men. In Russia, latrines appeared under Peter I.

"Caution, water!"

According to the description of many guests of Paris, among whom was the great Leonardo da Vinci, there was a terrible stench on the streets. It got to the point that, in the absence of toilets, the chamber pot was easily poured out of the window directly onto the street. It was then that wide-brimmed hats appeared, which were not only a tribute to fashion, but also a common necessity. Since, due to the lack of sewage, the contents of the night pots poured directly from the windows. At the end of the 13th century, a law was passed in Paris, which read: “When pouring out a chamber pot from a window, you need to shout:“ Caution! Water!".

In the XIII century appeared underwear. This event has further strengthened the consciousness that you can and not wash. The clothes were very expensive, so it was quite expensive to wash them, but it was much easier to wash the underwear. Know, by the way wore silk underwear. The reason for its popularity is simple. There were no parasites in slippery matter, simply because they had nothing to cling to.


Adrian van Ostade, "Charlatan", 1648

"For from childhood they did not enter the water"

In medieval Europe, clean, healthy teeth were considered a sign of low origin. Noble ladies were proud of bad teeth. Representatives of the nobility, who by nature got healthy white teeth, usually embarrassed them and tried to smile less often so as not to demonstrate their “shame”.

People are so unaccustomed to water procedures that Dr. F.E. Biltsu in the popular textbook of medicine of the late XIX century had to persuade people to wash. “There are people who, in truth, do not dare to swim in a river or in a bath, since they have never entered the water since childhood. This fear is groundless, - wrote Bilz in the book “New Natural Treatment”. “After the fifth or sixth bath you can get used to this ...”.
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  1. The comment was deleted.
    1. The comment was deleted.
      1. nadezhiva
        nadezhiva 13 November 2017 07: 11
        +2
        First, they will publish it on the blog, and then, all as "encyclopedic data" together copy and post wink
        https://visualhistory.livejournal.com/250118.html
      2. ICT
        ICT 13 November 2017 07: 19
        +2
        Quote: venik
        (From European historians and writers

        1. ICT
          ICT 13 November 2017 07: 41
          0
          Yes, a lot and Russian here as if not at work
    2. voyaka uh
      voyaka uh 12 November 2017 15: 49
      +9
      Found a daily diary of some medieval German craftsman
      ("middle class" - I don’t remember which guild). He recorded everything in detail (including the setting
      natural necessities). And a warm bath with soap appears regularly once a week.
      And so his whole life. He did not celebrate his bath as something special that others did not have.
      1. The comment was deleted.
        1. The comment was deleted.
      2. Moore
        Moore 13 November 2017 04: 59
        +4
        I will illustrate the most innocent medieval image:

        Despite the church obscurantism (for it was present unambiguously), we washed ourselves for a sweet soul. There is an opinion that the “unwillingness” is associated with a shortage of firewood, which was outlined during deforestation, but this is debatable.
        Well, as for the lack of basic rudiments of sewerage and public hygiene - there is nothing to cover.
        1. venik
          venik 13 November 2017 15: 01
          +5
          Quote: Moore
          I will illustrate the most innocent medieval image:

          ==========
          And how many “before them” in these barrels was “washed”, IS IT WRITTEN ALSO WRITTEN ?????
          1. Moore
            Moore 13 November 2017 16: 18
            0
            Quote: venik

            And how many “before them” in these barrels was “washed”, IS IT WRITTEN ALSO WRITTEN ?????

            Can you prove the opposite?
      3. venik
        venik 13 November 2017 14: 59
        +4
        Quote: voyaka uh
        A daily diary of some medieval German artisan was found ("middle class" - I don’t remember which guild).

        ======
        In the in !!! Some kind of "artisan", Some kind of "guild"..... Well, in general EVERYTHING IS UNDERSTANDED !!!
        And "warm bath" ("with soap") !!!!!
        In this delirium believe something ????
      4. Nukesmoke
        Nukesmoke 13 November 2017 20: 02
        0
        I would like to read more about it. Although where coal was used, it was quite good with ablutions. But naturally, not everywhere.
    3. intuzazist
      intuzazist 12 November 2017 18: 10
      13
      Tell me, Europe’s defender, what type of water mixer are still used in England? And how do modern British wash and brush their teeth? I’m not talking about the "coffee in bed" custom !!! I do not allow myself to eat food with dirty hands, with a dirty face and not brushed teeth, even on a trip ............................... ........
      1. kalibr
        kalibr 12 November 2017 18: 29
        +8
        Oak Roots is a good book. But imagine that in all hotels faucets are European. Purely English with a cork stopper plug must be searched. It can also be in private houses somewhere in Wales. Or Scotland in the north. But in London, and even in the small towns of the center, everything has long been European. I have a student married to an Englishman, and students work there every summer. Provide the latest information. The guys from Rostum learn English there. My question amazed them. By the way, there are people living in England here in VO - it’s a pity, of course, that they don’t appear so often. It’s interesting to ask them ...
        1. voyaka uh
          voyaka uh 12 November 2017 23: 49
          +5
          My oldest son was renting an apartment in London in an old house. The bathtub was redone in European style, and the kitchen still had two separate taps above the sink. There and the layout of the apartments are many oddities. In order not to touch the walls of the two bedrooms of two neighboring apartments, such “dead” courtyards with a width of a meter are made between them. It’s kind of yours, but impossible to use. And littering like a pantry or making him a roof is prohibited. In general, in London there are many such household jokes. You rent an apartment for 3000 pounds a month, and it has the coolest staircase without a railing.
          1. venik
            venik 13 November 2017 15: 11
            +5
            Quote: voyaka uh
            My oldest son was renting an apartment in London in an old house. The bathtub was redone in European style, and the kitchen still had two separate taps above the sink.

            =======
            Well, if your son "rents" an apartment in London, inold house", then take an interest with him, please - WHERE are the sewage, water and heat supply pipes located !!! They are attached OUTSIDE (on the" courtyard "facade !!!). And this means - only ONE - in the construction of houses "all this economy" is provided DID NOT HAVE!!!!! It was installed only in the late 19th and 20th centuries !!!
            In frosts, by the way, everything "this economy" (despite the "thermal insulation") is surprisingly freezing .... And what's next - oooo !!!!! About it ("freezing"), by the way, one native Londoner told me !!! And I had a chance to see these pipes !!!!
            PS Likewise, like "your humble servant" could not understand: "why the hell @ yen, you need" plugs "in the sink like in the bathroom, the acquaintances of the British could not understand - why do we not have them ???" And it's simple - they are used to "letting water (into the sink or bathtub) splash there, and get out (or take out hands), washing the dirty foam with a towel, and we are used to washing off the dirt with running water! What is better and more hygienic ?????
            1. voyaka uh
              voyaka uh 13 November 2017 15: 26
              +2
              "" rents "an apartment in London, in the" old house ", then ask him, please -
              WHERE are the sewer pipes, water and heat supply !!! They are attached OUTSIDE
              (on the "courtyard" facade !!!). "////

              Why should I be interested - I stayed there, spent the night. You did not guess:
              all pipes INSIDE walls old of crimson baked brick.
              Therefore, by the way, all repairs are very expensive and dreary - you need permission from the municipality for plumbers to break any piece of the wall. Even the inside. First comes the engineer. He also needs to pay
              1. nedgen
                nedgen 28 November 2017 01: 40
                +4
                Sorry, but you just visited London, and I’ve been repairing these very apartments for 14 years now. Pipes go inside the walls only at multi-storey houses, at two floor and one floor ALWAYS waste pipes go outside (if they are older than 20 years). Very often this is found even in four floor houses that are over 60 years old. As for washing dishes - at least 5-6 times I witnessed how the British wash dishes and grabbed his head right. Fill the sink of a dirty dishwasher with water, drip a preparation for washing and begin to rub, and all this WITHOUT DRAINING water. When all the pots are washed in this way, the water is drained and only then rinse the dishes. In the same way I saw several English shaving. In the same way, fill the sink with warm water and then rinse the razor in the same sink and so on until the end of the shave. And only when you finish draining the water, fill the sink again (and sometimes even use the same dirty water) take water from this sink, rinse your face (the water drains back into the same sink, of course) and only when you finish rinse your face, drain the water. Something like this. Of course, not all of them are like that ...
      2. gaura
        gaura 13 November 2017 09: 54
        +4
        And what does the type of mixer have to do with it? The bottom line is that before the plague, they went to the bathhouse, full of engravings of the time about the bathhouse. But when the plague epidemic broke out in the 13-14 century, many became infected after the bathhouse and became afraid of it like the plague itself.
        Conclusion: the plague epidemic made them so dirty. And in the 16-17 century this dirt was elevated to absolute. And the author reveals this picture very one-sidedly.
        1. Nukesmoke
          Nukesmoke 13 November 2017 20: 06
          +1
          It cannot be said, by the way, that refusal to wash had a great effect on people's health.
          And the Romans, by the way, love of water failed. Lead was used in the plumbing system, which, to put it mildly, was not very good for health.
    4. Setrac
      Setrac 12 November 2017 22: 07
      +4
      Quote: Antares
      In general, the myth of "unwashed Europe" is easy to refute.

      You can prove the fact that they did wash themselves, but the author does not deny this. The author says that they were washed less often than Russians, and much less often. Europeans were less clean than Russians, as now - they were dirty.
      1. Nukesmoke
        Nukesmoke 13 November 2017 20: 07
        +1
        There are simply fewer forests, and coal was widely introduced only in the 19th century, as was metallurgy in the production of high-quality pipes.
      2. kalibr
        kalibr 13 November 2017 22: 26
        +1
        I’ve been in Europe for five years in a row and ... it didn’t seem that people there are dirtier than ours. People, like people. Dressed simpler, less gold on them - yes. Well, there are more of them in Indians and Gypsies!
        1. voyaka uh
          voyaka uh 14 November 2017 11: 13
          +3
          European standard: bath, or shower with washcloth and shampoo - once
          in Week. So in Russia, as far as I remember my childhood. Other days
          - washed and washed.
          In Israel, because of the wet heat, it’s so impossible - you have to get up for a shower,
          at least one, and in the summer and 2-3 times a day
          1. Severok
            Severok 23 May 2018 20: 38
            0
            It's right. In a hot climate, where the average daily temperature is +26 degrees. Celsius and above and humidity within 70% without a shower in any way. What in the morning, in the evening, and when time allows, then at lunch it is necessary.
  2. Vasya Vassin
    Vasya Vassin 12 November 2017 15: 50
    +4
    After the fifth or sixth bath, you can get used to it ... ".

    Indeed, you can get used to it. But to a glass faster ...
  3. parusnik
    parusnik 12 November 2017 16: 01
    +3
    If they had not washed, they would have died out ... However, they survived ...
    1. Masya masya
      Masya masya 12 November 2017 16: 05
      +8
      Quote: parusnik
      If they had not washed, they would have died out ... However, they survived ...

      And do not speak and not typhoid, and not the plague does not take them ...
  4. Curious
    Curious 12 November 2017 16: 26
    11
    Why are fairy tales published in the "History" section? A site like for adults.
  5. kalibr
    kalibr 12 November 2017 16: 38
    15
    But in medieval Europe there were no toilets at all. Only the highest nobility. They say that the French royal court periodically moved from castle to castle, because there was literally nothing to breathe.

    In Russia, latrines appeared under Peter I.
    From where, God forgive me, such wretched people get out and write ... I’ll only consider these two statements and that’s enough. There was a bunch of articles about castles. And in them there are photos of the sort mass on the walls, at the base of the walls, and in various other places. The Chateau-Gaillard castle was taken by sending a scout through the latrine mine. That is, toilets in castles
    were, but in the palaces, no? In Russia, public toilets - visits appeared long before Peter the Great, as many foreign travelers across Russia have written about. It was noted that because the Russian tsar (not Peter!) Had a lot of gunpowder, because there were a lot of sorators, since saltpeter was mined by leaching the soil at the approaches. How much can you write illiterate nonsense. Well ... woman!
  6. Horseman without a head
    Horseman without a head 12 November 2017 17: 35
    16
    And slop on the head
    What in Russia, what in Europe of those years laughing
  7. intuzazist
    intuzazist 12 November 2017 18: 11
    +1
    Quote: parusnik
    If they had not washed, they would have died out ... However, they survived ...

    And how many have died out ?! There were no plague epidemics in Russia ...................
    1. Prometey
      Prometey 12 November 2017 19: 17
      +3
      Quote: intuzazist
      There were no plague epidemics in Russia.

      In the 14th century - even as it was, mowed down the entire princely court. A little smaller than in Europe.
    2. Antares
      Antares 12 November 2017 19: 42
      +3
      Quote: intuzazist
      There were no plague epidemics in Russia ..

      there was always a lot of merry in it, there were dark people. He did not heed hygiene advice and believed in the tales of the preachers.
      However, the plague is related to the baths only as an opportunity to become infected in a crowded place. From which these places of power tried to close.
      1. Nukesmoke
        Nukesmoke 13 November 2017 20: 09
        0
        Yeah, the first step Orlov during the pacification of the Plague riot, was the closure of public baths. Then the churches.
  8. kalibr
    kalibr 12 November 2017 18: 31
    +4
    Quote: intuzazist
    There were no plague epidemics in Russia

    You're not right! It was also very strong, during the time of Alexei Mikhailovich and the Copper riot. Where there was no plague even once (!), So it is in Poland!
    1. Curious
      Curious 12 November 2017 19: 00
      +5
      According to chronicles, the plague first appeared in Russia in 1352, when a pandemic of the plague, which took place mainly in the bubonic form, swept in the middle of the 1346th century across Asia, Europe (1353-XNUMX), North Africa and the island of Greenland.
      "The pestilence in Pskov is strong and evil throughout the whole of the Pskov’s land, but death will soon be quick: a man is bloody with blood, and on the third day he dies, and there is death everywhere."
      Complete collection of Russian chronicles. - T. 10. VIII. A chronicle collection called the Patriarch or Nikon Chronicle. / Ed. A.F. Bychkova. - SPb., 1885. - 244 p. - C. 223
      The epidemic of 1352 is described in all the annals of the Russians to the extent that we can make a completely clear picture of this event from this annals description. The plague appeared in Pskov in the summer of 1352 and, apparently, immediately assumed vast dimensions. Mortality was enormous. The priests did not have time to bury the dead. During the night, up to 30 or more corpses were accumulated at each church. 3-5 corpses were put in one coffin. Everyone was overcome by fear and horror. Seeing death everywhere and constantly before them and considering the fatal outcome inevitable, many began to think only about saving the soul, went to monasteries, distributed their property, and sometimes even children to strangers, thereby transferring the infection to new homes.
      In 1401, and according to the Nikon Chronicle in 1402, the pestilence in Smolensk is described, but without indicating symptoms. Pestilence, which appeared in Pskov in 1403, is described in the annals as “pestilence by iron,” which is why we can classify it as plague epidemics. This plague is interesting in that it is the first mention of cases of recovery in chronicles, although it is said that such an outcome is rare; most patients died on the 2nd or 3rd day of illness, as in previous epidemics. Pestilence was repeated in Pskov in 1406 and 1407.
      After a 9-year hiatus, the plague again visited Russia in 1417, capturing mainly the northern regions and having terrible mortality. According to the chronicler's picture, death mowed down people, like a sickle mowing ears of corn. Since that time, the plague, with short breaks, began to visit Russia often. Then, in 1419, the pestilence is described in the annals, first in Kiev, and then throughout RORossiya, Russia, but nothing is said about the symptoms of the disease. It is possible that this was a continuation of the epidemic of 1417-1418, or maybe the plague that was raging in Poland was brought through Kiev to Russia. In 1420, almost all annals contain a description of pestilence in various cities of Russia. In some chronicles nothing is said about the symptoms of the disease, in some it is called short, in others it is said that people were dying with "iron." Obviously, both forms of plague were immediately observed - pulmonary and bubonic. The cities of Kostroma, Yaroslavl, Galich, Plessa, Rostov, Novgorod and Pskov were especially affected.
      These are excerpts from Derbek, F.A. The history of the plague epidemics in Russia. Doctor of Medicine dissertation. SPb., 1905.
      You can read the same
      Vasiliev, K.G., Segal, A.E. The history of epidemics in Russia. M., Medgiz 1960.
    2. Antares
      Antares 12 November 2017 19: 43
      +3
      Quote: kalibr
      Where there was no plague even once (!), So it is in Poland!

      In 1351, the plague struck Poland. By 1352, 25 million people died in Europe, a third of the population
      “Were not affected” - it is said loudly, rather, it is a lower percentage of deaths than throughout the rest of Europe. King Casimir the Great, who ruled the plague,
      What really matters is population density. In Poland, it was an order of magnitude smaller than, for example, in France or Italy. Any epidemic spreads faster in a crowded city than in a rural area.
      Another mechanism for the spread of bubonic plague. Rat fleas passed it. And either in Poland cats were more fond of than everywhere, or there was nothing for rats to eat there.
      But interestingly, with the city of Milan, everything is clearer and simpler. There was also a low mortality rate. Upon detection of the patient, the house with him, all households (and a couple of houses in the neighborhood) were walled up, walling around the perimeter. Cruel, but effective.
      I bet on Japan, they even sent scouts to China to collect information on the plague and the consequences. If they had raged, they would not need such information.
  9. Prometey
    Prometey 12 November 2017 19: 15
    +8
    Yes, really, fairy tales about how "there" didn’t wash, but the bathhouse in Russia ... Public baths appeared in medieval Italy and from there began to spread to other European countries.
    The Catholic Church never forbade washing - well, she did not deal with such trifles.
    A man cannot but wash in principle - he will rot from the dirt. Well, people in Medieval Europe were not such stupid animals, so as not to understand this. If there are any crowned persons who boasted that they washed 2 times in their lives - you need to read between the lines - it was most likely a hot bath. Ablutions in the basin were performed regularly.
    Louis XIV stole not from dirt, but from gum disease - gingivitis. Night pots appeared in the same royal palaces in the 16th century. And as already correctly noted - in the Medieval castles there was a sewage system for sewage. In cities, including Russia, sewers began to be laid in the 19th century. In Moscow and St. Petersburg until the middle of the 19th century, all sewage merged directly into the city river. And now logically think about why people never bathed in the rivers - because they saw that they were washed off there.
    1. nedgen
      nedgen 28 November 2017 01: 55
      0
      Well, dear Prometheus, I don’t know how in castles of other countries but in the British - to name a mine in the fortress wall that was now the water level in the defensive ditch which is used as a waste place, somehow the language doesn’t turn to be called a sewer.
  10. vladimirvn
    vladimirvn 12 November 2017 20: 12
    14
    Enough to prove the exclusivity and originality of our people, by belittling others. They are already laughing at us. We live in the richest country, practically impoverished. The people in Europe, their power, do not allow themselves to be treated like this.
    1. Krasnodar
      Krasnodar 12 November 2017 20: 44
      +6
      Quote: vladimirvn
      Enough to prove the exclusivity and originality of our people, by belittling others. They are already laughing at us. We live in the richest country, practically impoverished. The people in Europe, their power, do not allow themselves to be treated like this.

      There they perceive the authorities in a different way - as parasites living at the expense of the tax population, to whom the people are delegated power to properly manage all spheres of the state’s life.
    2. Setrac
      Setrac 12 November 2017 22: 14
      +1
      Quote: vladimirvn
      The people in Europe, their power, do not allow themselves to be treated like this.

      Yeah, it doesn’t allow .... Catalonia wanted to secede - they have the same democracy - took and separated. Not that we, the dense Russians, Crimea, contrary to the decision of the people, remained part of the Ukraine.
      1. vladimirvn
        vladimirvn 12 November 2017 22: 17
        +3
        The Soviet Union, contrary to the will of the people, did not even try to save, Gorbachev, and a gang of drunks. Judge them. Even a death sentence.
    3. Rey_ka
      Rey_ka 13 November 2017 12: 24
      +1
      Could you tell me more about the poor? I have developed an excellent definition of the word BEGGAR - a person whose desire significantly exceeds needs and opportunities. Unlike Ozhegovsky, where POVERTY is extreme poverty! Agree, it’s hard to call a beggar a person who did not buy a loaf of bread but took a smartphone. Well, yes, the 10th did not make a living wage
      1. vladimirvn
        vladimirvn 13 November 2017 13: 15
        0
        I won’t give a classic definition of poverty. But in settlements of the Russian Federation with a population of up to 100 tons, the salary is 12-15 thousand, the pension is about the same. And there are half of the country. How much does communal communal firewood with coal cost? Collect the child in school, I don’t speak at the university to learn. How much are the drugs, you know? Transportation prices are well known. How much is left? This poverty is called. Not up to iPhones like that.
        1. your1970
          your1970 25 January 2018 19: 37
          0
          Quote: vladimirvn
          I won’t give a classic definition of poverty. But in settlements of the Russian Federation with a population of up to 100 tons, the salary is 12-15 thousand, the pension is about the same. And there are half of the country. How much does communal communal firewood with coal cost? Collect the child in school, I don’t speak at the university to learn. How much are the drugs, you know? Transportation prices are well known. How much is left? This poverty is called. Not up to iPhones like that.
          -a usual school, the usual tenth grade of an ordinary town with a population of 30 people and a salary of 000-12 rubles. Not a neighborhood of megacities - the province: "To the village! To the aunt! To the wilderness! To Saratov!" ...
          In a class for 26 people, there are 16 iPhones of different models and 4 samsungs (more than 20 worth). The same ratio in other classes ...
          Mine is showing off among classmates by the fact that he has NOT an iPhone - like everyone else...
  11. Svidetel 45
    Svidetel 45 13 November 2017 00: 02
    +3
    It seems to be a site for discussing serious issues, but periodically such nonsense is posted on its pages. They are trying to convince us that, in the order of things, they bowed to the ladies who were crawling with lice, waving a hat ... and ... almost kneeling in shit, and all this combined with an extraordinary rise in spirituality in the period 15-18 centuries - great music, painting, sculpture, literature, architecture !?
    It is clear that the conditions for maintaining personal hygiene in Europe at that time were, to put it mildly, more modest than in our time, especially when there were wars, epidemics of diseases, natural disasters, but still, to draw such wild pictures of the everyday life of Europeans, you just need to have sick imagination.
    1. kalibr
      kalibr 13 November 2017 22: 21
      +2
      Tread the other - exalt yourself! The simplest but most effective rule. But now we have such a thing as a bidet is absent in houses (even new ones), and among the dirty Europeans this is a completely ordinary thing.
  12. parma
    parma 13 November 2017 08: 08
    0
    Um .... Screaming "Uh-h-h-y" when? Again, Russia is a beacon of culture and science (though in some areas it was true in certain eras, although this relay stick was transmitted from time to time across all of Europe)? We close our eyes to some points, but if the Europeans really didn’t wash something to not wash off the holy water, explain to me why the knights in armor were doused with water to wash the waste products from the armor?
  13. Seal
    Seal 13 November 2017 18: 02
    0
    Roman baths were visited daily. It was a separate culture.

    Somehow foggy written. Should it be understood that:
    a) all the "Romans" termas visited daily
    or the author meant that just
    b) "the terms worked seven days a week, every day"?
    By the way, they had public toilet rooms, where people talked calmly.

    Well, just like that, she skillfully writes that it seems that she was also located there, well, between the "ancient Romans" sitting over the glasses laughing
    1. kalibr
      kalibr 13 November 2017 18: 53
      0
      I had an article about Roman baths on the website Pravda.ru - you can see.
  14. kalibr
    kalibr 13 November 2017 18: 51
    0
    Quote: parma
    explain to me why knights in armor were doused with water to wash waste products from armor?

    How is this known? I’ve been engaged in a knightly topic ... since 1995, re-read ... oh ... I wrote it myself ... but ... I have never seen any descriptions of "this" or a miniature. But I saw a lot of them ... But no. Where does the information come from? Enlighten me, ignoramus?
  15. Nukesmoke
    Nukesmoke 13 November 2017 20: 01
    0
    “Third-party” factors, such as rather limited wood supplies and a limited amount of clean water, should not be forgotten either. Equally, as well as the fact that public baths are very sanitary institutions.
    So it is not clear what is best - wash unclean cold water with poor heating, or not wash at all.
  16. Molot1979
    Molot1979 31 January 2018 10: 28
    +1
    Stamps, stamps, stamps and terrifying ignorance. Firstly, they did not always bathe in Europe. Back in the 13th century in the same Germany was full of public baths. This terrified the churches (men with women, naked in the same room !!!!!), but the laity somehow did not give a damn. Similarly in other countries. Everything has changed since the 14th century, when most of the population was strictly forbidden to cut forests. The woods ran out, they became an expensive commodity, but they still did not know how to stoke coal properly. The hearing aids were hung by the neck to death. So the Europeans got away with the habit of washing themselves. For a long time. Actually, the stinky Isabella and no less her stinking Louis are already the late Middle Ages, the end of the 15th century, and New Time - the middle of the 17th century. This has nothing to do with medieval habits than Peter the Great did to Khrushchev.
    Secondly, about incomparable lovers of Roman purity, money, of course, does not smell, as old Vespasian correctly noted. But still you need to know the subject a little deeper than just one Roman proverb. So, in Rome, where, according to the Ator, "hygiene was elevated to unimaginable heights," not everything was so rosy. For example, public toilets. Yes, they were, and that’s good. But what’s it, sorry, wiped your ass? Toilet paper? The straw Rags? Live goslings, finally? No no and one more time no. The point there was cleaned with special sponges that were mounted on a stick. Wipe off - put the wiping stick in place, in a special vessel with vinegar. Let the next visitor take advantage. How do you like this hygiene? So do not drool over how remarkably clean the descendants of Romulus and Remus lived.
  17. vnord
    vnord 31 January 2018 10: 53
    0
    Quote: kalibr
    But imagine that in all hotels faucets are European. Purely English with a cork stopper plug must be searched. Also in private homes, somewhere

    oh well, when I was in the Canary Islands, Father Tenerife in a bungalow while trying to wash was shocked by these two gates. They pour water into the wash basin, first brush their teeth and then wash themselves with this water. I had to immediately buy plates to pour water